Who are you?

My name is James Rosenzweig.  I’m an academic librarian at a medium-sized public university, a job I’ve had for a few years now (prior to coming here, I worked at another similarly-sized public university). Prior to that, I worked as a part-time reference specialist and a part-time digital projects specialist for a university archive/rare book library.  For five years before that, I was a teacher of literature and history at a public high school.

All of these things make me interested in books, clearly.  And when I saw a bookmark at Powell’s City of Books that listed the Pulitzer Prize-winning novels, and realized how few I’d read, I thought it might be an interesting project to read them all in chronological order—to get a sense of what American literature has been, according to one judgment, anyhow.  And as I’ve always thought blogging would be interesting, I decided to keep a record of my journey here.  We’ll see if I make it to the end, and how many of you stick with me for the duration.  For now, I don’t have anything else to say, really.  Thanks for dropping by.

Oh, and if you’d like to contact me directly, rather than leaving a comment on any particular page or post, use the form below to send whatever message you might have: thanks!

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5 comments on “Who are you?

  1. it would be great to post a link to your email address, in case some want to contact you for more discussion? just a thought!

    • jwrosenzweig says:

      Sorry I never replied to this, Karen! I’m a bit hesitant to post my email address (given how spammers crawl for such things, these days), but if anyone who doesn’t know me wants my email address to chat about books (these or others), just ask politely in any comment field around here and I’ll happily communicate it to you in some fashion that will avoid the evils of spam. But I really hope that folks who want to talk books will talk about them here in comments, so that the conversation is larger than just me and you!

  2. lasaine says:

    Good luck! I recently finished reading all the Pulitzer (Fiction) Winners, and felt as if I had made a quick tour of how Americans’ definition of “America” changed in the last century.

    It took me about 2 years, but was the most rewarding reading project I’ve ever done. I wasn’t organized enough to blog about the experience, so I look forward to seeing your reviews!

  3. […] James and I have been exchanging thoughts on Gone With the Wind for the past week or so (I in defense of Gone With the Wind, and he in question of it) —  and I’ve decided to practice a bit of my listening skills and see what he has to say about the matter. Because if I’m being honest? The history I know of when it comes to the antebellum era in the South has been mainly through Gone With the Wind and my appreciation of Mitchell’s reported adherence to fact in her novel. (Gone With the Wind was approved by her father, president of the Atlanta Historical Society back in the 1930s, who thought the story fluff, if I recall, but found the historical detail on Georgia’s involvement in the war flawless.) […]

  4. […] James and I have been exchanging thoughts on Gone With the Wind for the past week or so (I in defense of Gone With the Wind, and he in question of it) — and I’ve decided to practice a bit of my listening skills and see what he has to say about the matter. Because if I’m being honest? The history I know of when it comes to the antebellum era in the South has been mainly through Gone With the Wind and my appreciation of Mitchell’s reported adherence to fact in her novel. (Gone With the Wind was approved by her father, president of the Atlanta Historical Society back in the 1930s, who thought the story fluff, if I recall, but found the historical detail on Georgia’s involvement in the war flawless.) […]

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